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CDC Survey Finds Marijuana Prohibition Increases Teen Use

CDC Marijuana

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which is a federal government institution, has again discovered via their Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) survey that marijuana prohibition laws lead to an increase in teen marijuana use.

The CDC’s latest YRBSS survey report reveals that the rate of current marijuana use among U.S. high school students decreased from 2013 to 2015, even though states throughout the U.S. have continued to reform marijuana laws over those years.

Fewer high students used marijuana in 2015 than in previous years; yet, in 2015, recreational marijuana use was legal for adults in four states and medical marijuana use legal in more than 20 states.

The YRBSS also revealed that 21.7% of U.S. high school students claimed to have used marijuana in the past 30 days, which is down from 23.4% in 2013 and 26.2% in 1997. California, in 1997, was the first state to implement a medical marijuana law.

Initiatives to legalize recreational marijuana use for adults are expected to on the November ballots in Arizona, California, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, and possibly a few other states. Florida will be voting on an initiative to legalize medical marijuana.

(Photo: ibtimes.com)